TINSEL TOWN HEROES

Ellen Von Unwerth

Ellen Von Unwerth

Ellen Von Unwerth’s thirty-year storied career defined the aesthetic of the 90’s and 2000’s and has made her a staple of fashion photography. Crafting cinematic scenarios for her shoots, Von Unwerth’s flashy, kinky, and humorous photographs invite viewers to come along on a boisterous escapade. By furnishing each of her subjects with a new persona to inhabit, she allows their inhibitions to melt away. The story telling aspect in her creative process has allowed her to create images that are never static and begs the question, “what is really going on here?” The inherent sexuality in her images is never without fun, and the subjects within her works are always powerful - positioned in control of their sex appeal.

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February 23rd 2023 | 16:00


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TINSEL TOWN HEROES

Ellen Von Unwerth profile photo

Ellen Von Unwerth

Ellen Von Unwerth’s thirty-year storied career defined the aesthetic of the 90’s and 2000’s and has made her a staple of fashion photography. Crafting cinematic scenarios for her shoots, Von Unwerth’s flashy, kinky, and humorous photographs invite viewers to come along on a boisterous escapade. By furnishing each of her subjects with a new persona to inhabit, she allows their inhibitions to melt away. The story telling aspect in her creative process has allowed her to create images that are never static and begs the question, “what is really going on here?” The inherent sexuality in her images is never without fun, and the subjects within her works are always powerful - positioned in control of their sex appeal.

Fugue State Revisited, is an on-going exploration of the future legacies of photography, with a focus on the life span of digital files. After the loss of a hard drive that held 20 years of analog scans, I received only half the files back in recovery. The rest of the files were corrupted, each totally unique in how the machine damages and reinterprets the pixels. This alarming result made me begin to consider ever-shifting digital platforms and file formats, and I realized that much of the data we produce today could eventually fall into a black hole of inaccessibility. The Getty Research Institute states, “While you are still able to view family photographs printed over 100 years ago, a CD with digital files on it from only 10 years ago might be unreadable because of rapid changes to software and the devices we use to access digital content.” As an analog photographer, rather than let the machine have the last word, I have cyanotyped over my damaged digital scans. I use silhouettes of portraits from my archives as a way to conceal and reveal the corruption. By using historical processes to create a physical object, I guarantee that this image will not be lost in the current clash between the digital file and the materiality of a photographic print. Fugue State Revisited calls attention to the fact that today’s digital files may not retain their original state, or even exist, in the next century. As we are reliant on technology to keep our images intact for future generations, it begs the question, who will maintain our hard drives after we are gone? Will we be able to conserve photographs that speak to family histories? These are important considerations for our visual futures, as we may be leaving behind photographs that will be reimagined by machines.

Bushes & Succulents is Mona Kuhn’s celebration of the female essence - confident, raw and elegant, yet confrontational and unapologetic. She returned to the darkroom for the very first reason she fell in love with photography: the latent image. Inspired by the 1920s photo-surrealists, Kuhn explores the ethereal quality of solarization, a darkroom process that unites photography with sketching, in which the subject seems drawn by the alchemist's pencil, resulting in prints with layers of oxidized silver glow in the form of crystalized magic. Reminiscent of Georgia O’Keefe’s floral paintings, your eyes wander around the graceful lines, not knowing exactly what you are looking at. The solarisation process reveals human imperfections, not only in the metallic brilliance of the skin, but also brings to the surface a woman’s struggles, strengths, and power. “The frame reminded me of early childhood, at age eight or so, when I would jump in the shower with my mother. It resonates an adoration and child-like curiosity for what it is to be a woman. My intention is not to objectify the body, but to celebrate the female body and its essence. It was crucial for me to collaborate with women of various ages, ethnic backgrounds and body shapes. I wanted to embrace their beauty, their gracious moves, as well as their skin marks and signs of life. My intention is to bring them all together, to unify, just like Gwendolyn Brook's poem, which emphasizes the word "we". The power and beauty of my work lies in the confidence and naturalness of the people I photographed.” - Mona Kuhn

In the spring of 2020, panic surrounding COVID-19 erupted and mandatory shelter in place orders went into effect, forcing me to abandon long-planned portrait shoots, travel, and work in progress in my art studio. I found myself in a 340 sq ft apartment in a Bay-area neighborhood that was emptying by the day. The buzzing silence was profound. Two weeks into isolation, my drive to connect with others and make portraits only amplified. With no safe way to do so, I spontaneously turned the camera on myself to create a portrait. I printed it as a cyanotype, a simple nineteenth century photographic process that was only feasible due to the basic materials I happened to have on hand—a budget printer, transparency film and a package of fraying sheets of cotton pretreated with cyanotype chemicals. At first, I exposed the prints in the unpredictable spring sunlight coming through my third floor apartment window. As the seasons changed, I went on to make them in a garden, on the top of a car, or a patch of wobbly concrete tiles. I rinsed them in water and varying shades of blue emerged. I created a daily self-portrait using this technique for more than a year. I made most of these self-portraits inside various studio apartments that I lived in alone. To make the earliest pictures in the series, I had to move a couch every day to create space against a white wall near a window. I took others in fleeting spaces while traveling—in a guest room, in a medical examination room, during a pause in the wilderness, and later against the wall of an old California bungalow sandwiched between the mountains and the sea. In the beginning, I often tried to cover as much of my body and face as possible as a commentary on my fear of the virus and my efforts to guard against it. My armor and props ranged from common household items—potholders, tinfoil, dish towels, bedsheets, and toilet paper— to more telling evidence of the unusual consumption that resulted from being stuck indoors indefinitely— Amazon packaging, takeout bags and trash leftover from groceries purchased while wearing rubber gloves and sterilized in whatever way was possible and later consumed. These items shifted as the duration of the pandemic blurred into an unknown stretch of time. The portraits became less about those initial fears and more about confronting the boredom, anxiety, grief, and fatigue of living in indefinite isolation during a global pandemic. In total, I made these portraits for 377 consecutive days. I made the first portrait on March 30th, 2020, a day when my head was raging in pain, my throat was constricted, and the fear that I might have contracted COVID hung over me before testing was easily accessible. I made the last portrait on April 10th, 2021, the day I received my 2nd vaccination. The days, weeks, and months in between feel like a fever dream—frayed and flickering in multitudes of blue.

Elinor Carucci is renowned for sensuous portraits of her family and herself. Closer reveals the breadth of her work, from the erotic to the ethereal, exposing an emotionally honest world flooded with color. Fragments of her life are revealed through family and self-portraits and artful abstractions, making Closer a daring portrayal of the artist's intimate emotional geography. Carucci's work is first and foremost about the nuclear family, and also touches upon the universality of intimacy and mortality. Her parents, grandparents, and spouse are the central players, each of whom she portrays gently but unflinchingly in her images. Her photographs work with a definite color palette and there is a mesmerizing quality to the serene blues and vivid reds set against the myriad tones of bare skin. Closer: Photographs by Elinor Carucci is the artist's first monograph. Carucci received the International Center for Photography's Infinity Award for Best Young Photographer in 2001, and earned a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002.

The world's best curated Photography

Ellen Von Unwerth’s thirty-year storied career defined the aesthetic of the 90’s and 2000’s and has made her a staple of fashion photography. Crafting cinematic scenarios for her shoots, Von Unwerth’s flashy, kinky, and humorous photographs invite viewers to come along on a boisterous escapade. By furnishing each of her subjects with a new persona to inhabit, she allows their inhibitions to melt away. The story telling aspect in her creative process has allowed her to create images that are never static and begs the question, “what is really going on here?” The inherent sexuality in her images is never without fun, and the subjects within her works are always powerful - positioned in control of their sex appeal.

Fugue State Revisited, is an on-going exploration of the future legacies of photography, with a focus on the life span of digital files. After the loss of a hard drive that held 20 years of analog scans, I received only half the files back in recovery. The rest of the files were corrupted, each totally unique in how the machine damages and reinterprets the pixels. This alarming result made me begin to consider ever-shifting digital platforms and file formats, and I realized that much of the data we produce today could eventually fall into a black hole of inaccessibility. The Getty Research Institute states, “While you are still able to view family photographs printed over 100 years ago, a CD with digital files on it from only 10 years ago might be unreadable because of rapid changes to software and the devices we use to access digital content.” As an analog photographer, rather than let the machine have the last word, I have cyanotyped over my damaged digital scans. I use silhouettes of portraits from my archives as a way to conceal and reveal the corruption. By using historical processes to create a physical object, I guarantee that this image will not be lost in the current clash between the digital file and the materiality of a photographic print. Fugue State Revisited calls attention to the fact that today’s digital files may not retain their original state, or even exist, in the next century. As we are reliant on technology to keep our images intact for future generations, it begs the question, who will maintain our hard drives after we are gone? Will we be able to conserve photographs that speak to family histories? These are important considerations for our visual futures, as we may be leaving behind photographs that will be reimagined by machines.

Bushes & Succulents is Mona Kuhn’s celebration of the female essence - confident, raw and elegant, yet confrontational and unapologetic. She returned to the darkroom for the very first reason she fell in love with photography: the latent image. Inspired by the 1920s photo-surrealists, Kuhn explores the ethereal quality of solarization, a darkroom process that unites photography with sketching, in which the subject seems drawn by the alchemist's pencil, resulting in prints with layers of oxidized silver glow in the form of crystalized magic. Reminiscent of Georgia O’Keefe’s floral paintings, your eyes wander around the graceful lines, not knowing exactly what you are looking at. The solarisation process reveals human imperfections, not only in the metallic brilliance of the skin, but also brings to the surface a woman’s struggles, strengths, and power. “The frame reminded me of early childhood, at age eight or so, when I would jump in the shower with my mother. It resonates an adoration and child-like curiosity for what it is to be a woman. My intention is not to objectify the body, but to celebrate the female body and its essence. It was crucial for me to collaborate with women of various ages, ethnic backgrounds and body shapes. I wanted to embrace their beauty, their gracious moves, as well as their skin marks and signs of life. My intention is to bring them all together, to unify, just like Gwendolyn Brook's poem, which emphasizes the word "we". The power and beauty of my work lies in the confidence and naturalness of the people I photographed.” - Mona Kuhn

In the spring of 2020, panic surrounding COVID-19 erupted and mandatory shelter in place orders went into effect, forcing me to abandon long-planned portrait shoots, travel, and work in progress in my art studio. I found myself in a 340 sq ft apartment in a Bay-area neighborhood that was emptying by the day. The buzzing silence was profound. Two weeks into isolation, my drive to connect with others and make portraits only amplified. With no safe way to do so, I spontaneously turned the camera on myself to create a portrait. I printed it as a cyanotype, a simple nineteenth century photographic process that was only feasible due to the basic materials I happened to have on hand—a budget printer, transparency film and a package of fraying sheets of cotton pretreated with cyanotype chemicals. At first, I exposed the prints in the unpredictable spring sunlight coming through my third floor apartment window. As the seasons changed, I went on to make them in a garden, on the top of a car, or a patch of wobbly concrete tiles. I rinsed them in water and varying shades of blue emerged. I created a daily self-portrait using this technique for more than a year. I made most of these self-portraits inside various studio apartments that I lived in alone. To make the earliest pictures in the series, I had to move a couch every day to create space against a white wall near a window. I took others in fleeting spaces while traveling—in a guest room, in a medical examination room, during a pause in the wilderness, and later against the wall of an old California bungalow sandwiched between the mountains and the sea. In the beginning, I often tried to cover as much of my body and face as possible as a commentary on my fear of the virus and my efforts to guard against it. My armor and props ranged from common household items—potholders, tinfoil, dish towels, bedsheets, and toilet paper— to more telling evidence of the unusual consumption that resulted from being stuck indoors indefinitely— Amazon packaging, takeout bags and trash leftover from groceries purchased while wearing rubber gloves and sterilized in whatever way was possible and later consumed. These items shifted as the duration of the pandemic blurred into an unknown stretch of time. The portraits became less about those initial fears and more about confronting the boredom, anxiety, grief, and fatigue of living in indefinite isolation during a global pandemic. In total, I made these portraits for 377 consecutive days. I made the first portrait on March 30th, 2020, a day when my head was raging in pain, my throat was constricted, and the fear that I might have contracted COVID hung over me before testing was easily accessible. I made the last portrait on April 10th, 2021, the day I received my 2nd vaccination. The days, weeks, and months in between feel like a fever dream—frayed and flickering in multitudes of blue.

Mitch Dobrowner has been chasing storms since 2009, traveling throughout Western and Midwestern America to capture nature in its full fury. Represented by Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles.

Elinor Carucci is renowned for sensuous portraits of her family and herself. Closer reveals the breadth of her work, from the erotic to the ethereal, exposing an emotionally honest world flooded with color. Fragments of her life are revealed through family and self-portraits and artful abstractions, making Closer a daring portrayal of the artist's intimate emotional geography. Carucci's work is first and foremost about the nuclear family, and also touches upon the universality of intimacy and mortality. Her parents, grandparents, and spouse are the central players, each of whom she portrays gently but unflinchingly in her images. Her photographs work with a definite color palette and there is a mesmerizing quality to the serene blues and vivid reds set against the myriad tones of bare skin. Closer: Photographs by Elinor Carucci is the artist's first monograph. Carucci received the International Center for Photography's Infinity Award for Best Young Photographer in 2001, and earned a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002.

Bushes & Succulents is Mona Kuhn’s celebration of the female essence - confident, raw and elegant, yet confrontational and unapologetic. She returned to the darkroom for the very first reason she fell in love with photography: the latent image. Inspired by the 1920s photo-surrealists, Kuhn explores the ethereal quality of solarization, a darkroom process that unites photography with sketching, in which the subject seems drawn by the alchemist's pencil, resulting in prints with layers of oxidized silver glow in the form of crystalized magic. Reminiscent of Georgia O’Keefe’s floral paintings, your eyes wander around the graceful lines, not knowing exactly what you are looking at. The solarisation process reveals human imperfections, not only in the metallic brilliance of the skin, but also brings to the surface a woman’s struggles, strengths, and power. “The frame reminded me of early childhood, at age eight or so, when I would jump in the shower with my mother. It resonates an adoration and child-like curiosity for what it is to be a woman. My intention is not to objectify the body, but to celebrate the female body and its essence. It was crucial for me to collaborate with women of various ages, ethnic backgrounds and body shapes. I wanted to embrace their beauty, their gracious moves, as well as their skin marks and signs of life. My intention is to bring them all together, to unify, just like Gwendolyn Brook's poem, which emphasizes the word "we". The power and beauty of my work lies in the confidence and naturalness of the people I photographed.” - Mona Kuhn

In the spring of 2020, panic surrounding COVID-19 erupted and mandatory shelter in place orders went into effect, forcing me to abandon long-planned portrait shoots, travel, and work in progress in my art studio. I found myself in a 340 sq ft apartment in a Bay-area neighborhood that was emptying by the day. The buzzing silence was profound. Two weeks into isolation, my drive to connect with others and make portraits only amplified. With no safe way to do so, I spontaneously turned the camera on myself to create a portrait. I printed it as a cyanotype, a simple nineteenth century photographic process that was only feasible due to the basic materials I happened to have on hand—a budget printer, transparency film and a package of fraying sheets of cotton pretreated with cyanotype chemicals. At first, I exposed the prints in the unpredictable spring sunlight coming through my third floor apartment window. As the seasons changed, I went on to make them in a garden, on the top of a car, or a patch of wobbly concrete tiles. I rinsed them in water and varying shades of blue emerged. I created a daily self-portrait using this technique for more than a year. I made most of these self-portraits inside various studio apartments that I lived in alone. To make the earliest pictures in the series, I had to move a couch every day to create space against a white wall near a window. I took others in fleeting spaces while traveling—in a guest room, in a medical examination room, during a pause in the wilderness, and later against the wall of an old California bungalow sandwiched between the mountains and the sea. In the beginning, I often tried to cover as much of my body and face as possible as a commentary on my fear of the virus and my efforts to guard against it. My armor and props ranged from common household items—potholders, tinfoil, dish towels, bedsheets, and toilet paper— to more telling evidence of the unusual consumption that resulted from being stuck indoors indefinitely— Amazon packaging, takeout bags and trash leftover from groceries purchased while wearing rubber gloves and sterilized in whatever way was possible and later consumed. These items shifted as the duration of the pandemic blurred into an unknown stretch of time. The portraits became less about those initial fears and more about confronting the boredom, anxiety, grief, and fatigue of living in indefinite isolation during a global pandemic. In total, I made these portraits for 377 consecutive days. I made the first portrait on March 30th, 2020, a day when my head was raging in pain, my throat was constricted, and the fear that I might have contracted COVID hung over me before testing was easily accessible. I made the last portrait on April 10th, 2021, the day I received my 2nd vaccination. The days, weeks, and months in between feel like a fever dream—frayed and flickering in multitudes of blue.

Mitch Dobrowner has been chasing storms since 2009, traveling throughout Western and Midwestern America to capture nature in its full fury. Represented by Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles.

Elinor Carucci is renowned for sensuous portraits of her family and herself. Closer reveals the breadth of her work, from the erotic to the ethereal, exposing an emotionally honest world flooded with color. Fragments of her life are revealed through family and self-portraits and artful abstractions, making Closer a daring portrayal of the artist's intimate emotional geography. Carucci's work is first and foremost about the nuclear family, and also touches upon the universality of intimacy and mortality. Her parents, grandparents, and spouse are the central players, each of whom she portrays gently but unflinchingly in her images. Her photographs work with a definite color palette and there is a mesmerizing quality to the serene blues and vivid reds set against the myriad tones of bare skin. Closer: Photographs by Elinor Carucci is the artist's first monograph. Carucci received the International Center for Photography's Infinity Award for Best Young Photographer in 2001, and earned a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002.


The finest Digital Art, carefully curated by our team of experts

Khuwab ki Tabeer ‘Interpretation of a dream’ is Maliha Abidi’s latest series. This collection of 4 NFTs follows a story of a South-Asian girl and all the things she dreams about because to her, there is no limit, restrictions or barriers that stand in her way of achieving any of it. Each of the unique art pieces celebrate Maliha’s heritage as a Pakistani-American artist through use of distinct elements native to Pakistan’s culture. The series reminds us of our younger self and takes us back to the times when we used to wonder during the nights about our dreams, what we want to be and how it’ll escape the challenges we faced as our young selves. A fifth part (not for sale) to this series is a piece which follows on from the story where the protagonist reflects and comes face to face with her inner fearlessness.

GAMUT-93 is a series of pixel-based video paintings informed by the Op art movement, primitive computer graphics, and contemporary graffiti. Gravitating between symbolism and abstraction, the artwork whispers in micro-narratives through the use of silent haiku charades, hypnotic visual ambience, and vivid graphic techno.

Traces is a collaborative project of conceptual artist Kim Asendorf and his wife Jana, who has been exploring the relationship between man and nature for many years. A living image of nature and the traces mankind leaves behind. A rock, formed hundreds of millions of years ago; a plant evolving over millions of years. Both are symbols of nature untouched. Color symbolizes thousands of years of human impact on nature. Animation creates another level of traces to get lost within, an indefinite change of state, we can just stand by and watch. Photography is used explicitly as an act of digitization and as an extension of nature into the digital world. After Doppelgänger, artist and Quantum Art founder Justin Aversano’s groundbreaking NFT project, Traces is Kim's second foray into real time photography manipulation. The audience will enjoy a new aesthetic, one visually optimized to mesmerize. More importantly, Asendorf hopes this work will make the audience think about the traces they leave behind in the nature. To view the full resolution artwork, just go to the following link and replace {TOKEN_ID} with the number of your piece. `https://quantum.mypinata.cloud/ipfs/QmXEsmZAjEH9pa7ifDoViLSmqcKttiax716iXShyknGGCx/?token={TOKEN_ID}`

Each artwork from SLABS also comes with a corresponding airdrop, titled DISCS. DISCS are circular compositions based on SLABS, moving away from the rectangular format to create a more sculptural experience, where each artwork appears like a hovering spherical object. Finally, there are 50 SLABS in total: 45 of them are composed and 5 of them are all-overs, making them more unique.

Patterns of Life presents work by Dutch contemporary painter Francien Krieg. Drawing from multiple series, the pieces convey the artist's frank and abiding interest in the human body. Birth and growth are captured as magical if fleeting experiences, eventually giving way to maturity, wisdom, and one's reckoning with mortality. Our bodies are records of all that we've done. Krieg commemorates each scar and wrinkle a righteous reminder of what it means to live.

Mercy Thokozane Minah explores intimacy and its numerous forms in queer Black life. In Press Play, the self-taught South African artist pays homage to the intimacy of sport as a leisurely and rigorous cultural currency that connects people from all walks of life, emphasizing how it fortifies Black queer and trans communities. The 20-piece collection of digital paintings - some combined with photographed skies - is a study of Black queer bodies in motion. Press Play posits how they interact with environments dedicated to play, what their relationship is to competition, how they orient themselves towards winning as well as the catharsis and pleasure of leisure.

The finest Digital Art, carefully curated by our team of experts

Khuwab ki Tabeer ‘Interpretation of a dream’ is Maliha Abidi’s latest series. This collection of 4 NFTs follows a story of a South-Asian girl and all the things she dreams about because to her, there is no limit, restrictions or barriers that stand in her way of achieving any of it. Each of the unique art pieces celebrate Maliha’s heritage as a Pakistani-American artist through use of distinct elements native to Pakistan’s culture. The series reminds us of our younger self and takes us back to the times when we used to wonder during the nights about our dreams, what we want to be and how it’ll escape the challenges we faced as our young selves. A fifth part (not for sale) to this series is a piece which follows on from the story where the protagonist reflects and comes face to face with her inner fearlessness.

GAMUT-93 is a series of pixel-based video paintings informed by the Op art movement, primitive computer graphics, and contemporary graffiti. Gravitating between symbolism and abstraction, the artwork whispers in micro-narratives through the use of silent haiku charades, hypnotic visual ambience, and vivid graphic techno.

Traces is a collaborative project of conceptual artist Kim Asendorf and his wife Jana, who has been exploring the relationship between man and nature for many years. A living image of nature and the traces mankind leaves behind. A rock, formed hundreds of millions of years ago; a plant evolving over millions of years. Both are symbols of nature untouched. Color symbolizes thousands of years of human impact on nature. Animation creates another level of traces to get lost within, an indefinite change of state, we can just stand by and watch. Photography is used explicitly as an act of digitization and as an extension of nature into the digital world. After Doppelgänger, artist and Quantum Art founder Justin Aversano’s groundbreaking NFT project, Traces is Kim's second foray into real time photography manipulation. The audience will enjoy a new aesthetic, one visually optimized to mesmerize. More importantly, Asendorf hopes this work will make the audience think about the traces they leave behind in the nature. To view the full resolution artwork, just go to the following link and replace {TOKEN_ID} with the number of your piece. `https://quantum.mypinata.cloud/ipfs/QmXEsmZAjEH9pa7ifDoViLSmqcKttiax716iXShyknGGCx/?token={TOKEN_ID}`

Each artwork from SLABS also comes with a corresponding airdrop, titled DISCS. DISCS are circular compositions based on SLABS, moving away from the rectangular format to create a more sculptural experience, where each artwork appears like a hovering spherical object. Finally, there are 50 SLABS in total: 45 of them are composed and 5 of them are all-overs, making them more unique.

Patterns of Life presents work by Dutch contemporary painter Francien Krieg. Drawing from multiple series, the pieces convey the artist's frank and abiding interest in the human body. Birth and growth are captured as magical if fleeting experiences, eventually giving way to maturity, wisdom, and one's reckoning with mortality. Our bodies are records of all that we've done. Krieg commemorates each scar and wrinkle a righteous reminder of what it means to live.

Mercy Thokozane Minah explores intimacy and its numerous forms in queer Black life. In Press Play, the self-taught South African artist pays homage to the intimacy of sport as a leisurely and rigorous cultural currency that connects people from all walks of life, emphasizing how it fortifies Black queer and trans communities. The 20-piece collection of digital paintings - some combined with photographed skies - is a study of Black queer bodies in motion. Press Play posits how they interact with environments dedicated to play, what their relationship is to competition, how they orient themselves towards winning as well as the catharsis and pleasure of leisure.

Traces is a collaborative project of conceptual artist Kim Asendorf and his wife Jana, who has been exploring the relationship between man and nature for many years. A living image of nature and the traces mankind leaves behind. A rock, formed hundreds of millions of years ago; a plant evolving over millions of years. Both are symbols of nature untouched. Color symbolizes thousands of years of human impact on nature. Animation creates another level of traces to get lost within, an indefinite change of state, we can just stand by and watch. Photography is used explicitly as an act of digitization and as an extension of nature into the digital world. After Doppelgänger, artist and Quantum Art founder Justin Aversano’s groundbreaking NFT project, Traces is Kim's second foray into real time photography manipulation. The audience will enjoy a new aesthetic, one visually optimized to mesmerize. More importantly, Asendorf hopes this work will make the audience think about the traces they leave behind in the nature. To view the full resolution artwork, just go to the following link and replace {TOKEN_ID} with the number of your piece. `https://quantum.mypinata.cloud/ipfs/QmXEsmZAjEH9pa7ifDoViLSmqcKttiax716iXShyknGGCx/?token={TOKEN_ID}`

Each artwork from SLABS also comes with a corresponding airdrop, titled DISCS. DISCS are circular compositions based on SLABS, moving away from the rectangular format to create a more sculptural experience, where each artwork appears like a hovering spherical object. Finally, there are 50 SLABS in total: 45 of them are composed and 5 of them are all-overs, making them more unique.

Patterns of Life presents work by Dutch contemporary painter Francien Krieg. Drawing from multiple series, the pieces convey the artist's frank and abiding interest in the human body. Birth and growth are captured as magical if fleeting experiences, eventually giving way to maturity, wisdom, and one's reckoning with mortality. Our bodies are records of all that we've done. Krieg commemorates each scar and wrinkle a righteous reminder of what it means to live.

Mercy Thokozane Minah explores intimacy and its numerous forms in queer Black life. In Press Play, the self-taught South African artist pays homage to the intimacy of sport as a leisurely and rigorous cultural currency that connects people from all walks of life, emphasizing how it fortifies Black queer and trans communities. The 20-piece collection of digital paintings - some combined with photographed skies - is a study of Black queer bodies in motion. Press Play posits how they interact with environments dedicated to play, what their relationship is to competition, how they orient themselves towards winning as well as the catharsis and pleasure of leisure.


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